Solar eclipse preparation at Saucier Elementary

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This coming Monday people across the country will be able to experience a solar eclipse. Something we haven’t seen in 38 years.
Many schools across the state are getting ready since students will be in class for much of the event.
Students at Saucier Elementary School have ventured beyond their classroom walls this week for a test run these few days before Monday’s solar eclipse. From the looks of it, they’re ready for it. “It comes every 97 years. It’s a once in a lifetime experience.”
Beth Whitt teaches sixth grade math and science. She and other teachers have been shedding light on what students will be watching come Monday. “They have learned that it has to be a full moon. They also know that there are 13 new moons, but that does not mean that there are 13 solar eclipses because of the five degree tilt of the moon axis and stuff. They have learned that. They know what an umbra is, penumbra is, and they can identify all of it.”
“The sun it shines on the moon and it doesn’t cover up the whole earth, but it covers up like 80 something percent of it.”
Creativity is the name of the game when it comes to lessons on the upcoming eclipse. “We are using fruits and vegetables to model the solar eclipse that is going to happen on August 21st.”
Teachers are also reminding kids to make sure they view the eclipse in a safe way, evidenced by posters that hang throughout the school hallways with safety tips for viewing. While this is one moment in time, teachers like Beth Whitt hope Monday is an experience these students will carry with them for years to come. “The next one won’t be until actually when they graduate in 2024. So we’ve been discussing how it happens. We’ve been doing hands on activities.”